Night of the Kings movie review (2021)


Lacôte uses Roman’s story to explain the historical cycle of violence, and how that cycle has affected his country. Lacôte also adds another dimension to Roman’s storytelling by making the MACA prisoners into Roman’s actors. Like a Greek Chorus, they interject Roman’s oration to perform songs dedicated to Zama. They cheer or jeer Roman’s narrative twists (we know Roman knew Zama, but we can’t tell if he’s telling us fact or fiction). At one point, Roman describes Zama as a scorpion, and the prisoners band together to intimate a scorpion. The inmates aren’t searching for truth in their storyteller. They know his tale is nonsensical. Nevertheless, there’s magic in letting a story overtake your mind, body, and spirit. It’s that disbelief from an admittedly unreliable narrator that gives these men freedom beyond the jailhouse walls.   

The way Lacôte uses Roman’s yarn to not only mix ancient folklore with modern mythmaking, but also theatrical song and dance, is a tremendous feat of filmmaking. Lacôte explored these topics in his earlier film “Run,” but here they’re pushed to more elaborate parameters. He is also buoyed by Tobie Marier-Robitaille’s evocative cinematography, which gracefully tracks each era’s unique mood, from the prison’s urgent orange lighting, to the warm purple regality of the period piece section, to the bright flatness of the present-day Lawless Quarter. Marier-Robitaille captures how the amber lamp glistening off Roman’s chest corresponds to the ticking red moon, functioning like the film’s major hidden character. 

The trick to “Night of the Kings” is also how Lacôte protects his ever-unfolding story from collapsing into meandering turns, or digressions, to maintain a lucid pace. “Night of the Kings” never drags during its breezy 93-minutes partly because the characters are mere set pieces. Take Silence (Denis Lavant), an eccentric coot with a rooster perched on his shoulder, whose sole role is to warn Roman. Or the ostensible patsy, the transgender woman prisoner Sexy (Gbazi Yves Landry). The flat characters would blunt most films, but considering the intricate nature of Lacôte’s world building, the underdevelopment is actually an asset that allows the sprawling film space to breathe. As does Koné’s acute performance. 

With “Night of the Kings” Lacôte collapses the bounds between eras, and dissolves myth and reality, performance and remembrance, into one whole. It’s an assured, energetic piece of epic filmmaking, one that celebrates how storytelling, oration, and folklore teach us about our past so we might change our present.    

You can view the original article HERE.

Sharon Osbourne talks cancel culture with Piers Morgan
Megan Fox Opens Up About Supporting Son Noah
Family Awarded $5 Mil After Country Club Home Repeatedly Pelted W/ Golf Balls
Dwayne Johnson Takes Over Vegas with Surprise Madame Tussauds Fan Visit
Ozark Pushes Off the Pier For Its Last Boat Ride | TV/Streaming
The Underbelly of Baltimore’s Police Corruption
Zombies Go Docile for 32 Seconds at a Time in Shudder’s Virus :32
Ebertfest 2022 Recap: A Golden Homecoming | Festivals & Awards
Brandi Carlile cancels festival show after testing positive for COVID-19 – Music News
Watch ‘Heartstopper’ cast join Baby Queen onstage in London
Electronic music pioneer Klaus Schulze dies aged 74 – Music News
Benefits announce 2022 UK tour
Virtual Reality Technologies Are Changing the Future
How to Install a Bike Rack for a Car
The Top MMA Fights We Want to See in 2022
Broncos bring back RB Gordon on 1-year contract
The Walking Dead’s Daryl and Carol Spinoff Loses Melissa McBride
Under The Banner Of Heaven Premiere Review: The Book Of Mormon’s Dark Side
Jensen Ackles Reveals He Wants to be Batman
Chicago Fire: Jesse Spencer to Return for Season Finale!
Zendaya and Tom Holland’s Best Style Moments
The Clothing Items Editors Always Rewear
The New Era Of BCBGMAXAZRIA Is Here
OOKIOH Swimsuits Review With Photos