Sasquatch movie review & film summary (2021)


Back in the early ‘90s, David Holthouse was at the wrong cannabis farm at the wrong time. While working undercover on the farm, he overheard a frantically told story about three Mexican workers who were torn to shreds, murdered by Bigfoot. For decades he’s never been sure if it was true, but it does match other stories about Bigfoot, in which workers had rocks thrown at them from the woods, and had heard rumbling sounds in the forest. Episode one of “Sasquatch” documents various people talking about Bigfoot as scientific fact, like a story they’re waiting for the rest of the world to catch up with. One self-proclaimed hunter talks about being crushed while in a tent; another talks of seeing the eyes of Bigfoot at 2AM one night when he was 10 years old, and has been trying to understand it since. 

This first episode is a bit of a Trojan horse for a true-crime story, and it almost backfires. Yes, it’s fascinating that the doc almost reaches levels of investigating Bigfoot’s existence, to prove that the crime happened, but it plays, initially, as simply quirky. Thankfully, “Sasquatch” is about far more than that—its initial ideas of a deadly myth, and trying to hunt a myth, are more of a context in how to watch the rest, as Holthouse’s interviews lead to more unsolved mysteries. Even as the documentary nearly forgets Sasquatch and the kooky characters, they come back with thematic urgency that makes the human elements all the more striking. And in the sharpness of Rofé’s documentary, it moves beyond these ideas without tokenizing them as kooky comic relief. They believe what they believe, but “Sasquatch” is on to something else. 

Rofé expands to focus on the competitive, dangerous cannabis business up in those northern California mountains, and to understand the culture of lawlessness and racism that permeates. It touches upon how the 19th century gold rush brought hopeful business people to the land, but not the most honorable, and that happened with a type of dope rush in the later 20th century—sure there were some hippies, but they were heavily armed, and there were Hell’s Angels too. Scene by scene, the documentary establishes a great deal of power in these parts, especially at the reclusive location of Spy Rock, where bodies are often found. 

You can view the original article HERE.

George Clooney Teases The Quarantining With Julia Roberts Got A Little Too Much At Times
Alex Rodriguez grilled about dating, plus Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck’s marriage
The Cast of Bling Empire Talks Season 3
‘Celebrity Big Brother’ Todrick Hall Ordered To Pay $102k In Unpaid Rent Lawsuit
AMC’s Interview with the Vampire is a Cheesy but Curious Series Adaptation | TV/Streaming
Plenty of Twists in This Noir Tale
James Bond Producer Recalls ‘Very Sad’ Meeting with Amy Winehouse for Quantum of Solace Theme
Life is Cheap … But Toilet Paper is Expensive movie review (2022)
Benny Blanco says he doesn’t like fame or being approached by fans ‘It just sucks’ – Music News
New version of ‘Three Lions’ confirmed for 2022 World Cup
Taylor Swift planning 2023 stadium tour – Music News
Yungblud to perform at NFL Halftime Show in London
Sources: Crude remark factored into Udoka ban
Japanese Pro Wrestling Icon Antonio Inoki Who Fought Ali Dead At 79
PGA Tour: LIV interfered with golfers’ contracts
Source: Tua out of hospital, returns to Miami
The Jeffrey Dahmer Story Crew Member Alleges Mistreatment During Production
Days of Our Lives Review Week of 9-26-22: Time Doesn’t Heal All Wounds
See Season 3 Episode 6 Review: The Lowlands
House of the Dragon Showrunner Says the Series Could Expand into Different Eras
Birkenstock Boston Soft Footbed Clog Review: With Photos
Daily News: Ryan Gosling for Gucci, Karl Is Confirmed, Rihanna’s Next Face of Fenty Contest, and More!
Barbara Palvin’s Plaid Miniskirt and Matching Bralette
Daily Media: Changes at Burberry