Marty Robbins – Gossip (Country Music Classics – 1956)



Martin David Robinson (September 26, 1925–December 8, 1982), known professionally as Marty Robbins, was an American singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist. One of the most popular and successful country and Western singers of his era, for most of his nearly four-decade career, Robbins was rarely far from the country music charts, and several of his songs also became pop hits.

Robbins was born in Glendale, a suburb of Phoenix, in Maricopa County, Arizona. He was reared in a difficult family situation. His father took odd jobs to support the family of ten children. His father’s drinking led to divorce in 1937. Among his warmer memories of his childhood, Robbins recalled having listened to stories of the American West told by his maternal grandfather, Texas Bob Heckle. Robbins left the troubled home at the age of 17 to serve in the United States Navy as an LCT coxswain during World War II. He was stationed in the Solomon Islands in the Pacific. To pass the time during the war, he learned to play the guitar, started writing songs, and came to love Hawaiian music.

After his discharge from the military in 1945, he began to play at local venues in Phoenix, then moved on to host his own show on KTYL. He thereafter had his own television show on KPHO-TV in Phoenix. After Little Jimmy Dickens made a guest appearance on Robbins’ TV show, Dickens got Robbins a record deal with Columbia Records. Robbins became known for his appearances at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee.

Robbins’s 1957 recording of “A White Sport Coat and a Pink Carnation” sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. His musical accomplishments include the Grammy Award for his 1959 hit and signature song “El Paso”, taken from his album Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs. “El Paso” was the first song to hit #1 on the pop chart in the 1960s. It was followed up, successfully, by “Don’t Worry”, which reached #3 on the pop chart in 1961, becoming his third, and last, Top 10 pop hit. “El Paso” was followed by two sequels: “Feleena” and “El Paso City”, both of which continued the story featured in the original song. Also in 1961, Robbins wrote the words and music and recorded “I Told the Brook,” a ballad later also recorded by Billy Thorpe.

He won the Grammy Award for the Best Country & Western Recording 1961, for his follow-up album More Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs, and was awarded the Grammy Award for Best Country Song in 1970, for “My Woman, My Woman, My Wife”. Robbins was named Artist of the Decade (1960–69) by the Academy of Country Music, was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1982, and was given a Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1998 for his song “El Paso”.

Robbins was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1975. For his contribution to the recording industry, Robbins has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6666 Hollywood Blvd.

Robbins has been honored by many bands, including the Grateful Dead who covered “El Paso”. The Who’s 2006 album Endless Wire includes the song “God Speaks Of Marty Robbins”. The song’s composer, Pete Townshend, explained that the song is about God deciding to create the universe just so he can hear some music, “and most of all, one of his best creations, Marty Robbins.” The Beasts of Bourbon released a song called “The Day Marty Robbins Died” on their 1984 debut album The Axeman’s Jazz. Johnny Cash recorded a version of “Big Iron” as part of his American Recordings series, which is included in the Cash Unearthed box set. Both Frankie Laine and Elvis Presley, among others, recorded versions of Robbins’s song “You Gave Me a Mountain”, with Laine’s recording reaching the pop and adult contemporary charts in 1969.

Robbins performed and recorded several songs by longtime songwriter Coleman Harwell, most notably “Thanks but No Thanks” in 1964; Robbins and his producers employed the top sessions musicians and singers including the Jordanaires to record Harwell’s songs. Harwell is the nephew of former Nashville Tennessean newspaper editor Coleman Harwell.

When Robbins was recording his 1961 hit “Don’t Worry”, session guitarist Grady Martin accidentally created a fuzz effect during the session. The song reached #1 on the country chart, and #3 on the pop chart. ~SOURCE: Wikipedia

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