Tim Robinson’s I Think You Should Leave Conjures More Brilliant Chaos in Third Season | TV/Streaming


Back in 2019, Robinson appeared on “Late Night with Seth Meyers,” in which the host summed up the show aptly: “People who will not admit they are wrong.” “I Think You Should Leave,” with six more 20-minute episodes, has hardly changed from such a set-up. And yet these skits prove that it blissfully still works. With Robinson sometimes acting as the most intense or most demure in the room, the series hasn’t engineered a sense of humor but a comedy structure applied to different social hells—work presentations, parties, appearing on game shows, etc. It would feel too familiar or repetitive if the sketches didn’t always break free to the strangest character obsessions a writer’s room could concoct (like with a series-topping bit that shows you what “The Driving Crooner” is). 

It’s strange but fitting how this plays out—there are so many disappointing comedy sequels and follow-ups, but “I Think You Should Leave” is continuous in its oddly brilliant ways. Each skit develops like a new chapter from a still-being-written saga about a world where rage is an epidemic, passing on from one character to another in the show. Take here, in which Will Forte plays a snooty man who crawls under a parked van in a driveway and gets his long ponytail stuck. He proceeds to throw a fit, which gets another man with a ponytail across the street all on his high horse. That’s not even the 10th funniest skit of this season, which makes all apparent how on-the-nose it would be if Robinson were to make a joke about someone who thinks the sky is falling. 

Like past installments, this series brings in other people who get a chance to be as intense as Robinson can be. If there’s any straining in this season, it’s in people who aren’t as practiced in this degree of screeching chaos. So while we see the likes of Tim Meadows, Tim Heidecker, and Fred Armisen, they look slightly out of their league, and the bits aren’t as strong. Returning heavyweight weirdos like Patti Harrison (with a bizarrely muted sketch) and Conner O’Malley are more immediately on Robinson’s wavelength.

You can view the original article HERE.

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